Question?

As I prepare my sermon on our membership vow, to be faithful in our presence, it got me thinking. We know the old saying, if a tree falls in the woods and no one is there, does it make noise.

Here is my question: If a sermon is preached and no one is there to hear it, is it still considering a sermon?

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6 thoughts on “Question?

  1. In the same way that a piece of music presented in an empty concert hall is still a piece of music, so a sermon preached in an empty sanctuary is still a sermon.

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  2. Yes its still a sermon.Are there undertones though of asking whether its a sermon worth preaching?Maybe not…I just couldn’t help but pull your question into whether preaching for 5 or 50 was any different…?

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  3. Hmmm… Calvinists likely think “yes,” but Wesleyans should probably answer “no.” Our pragmatic approach to ministry challenges our preachers to gather people to listen. At the end of the day, Rev. Jeremy Smith has a point: even a congregation of one (the preacher) still leaves room for the movement of the Spirit.

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  4. To toss this one out as well…since it is said, ‘where two or more are gathered…” wouldn’t you need more than just the preacher?As far as 5 or 50 people. No that is not necessarily where I was going (although I find it much more difficult to preach to 5 than 50). In my sermon I will be talking about our vow to be present. Thus to have worship we need you here to help create a worshipful space. If I preached to an empty sanctuary (which I do when I practice) it doesn’t feel the same when I do it again during the context of worship.Keep the thougths coming though.

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  5. you’ve got a trinity! Always more than two. A quorum! ZING! 😉I simply cannot preach a sermon when its not a worshipful atmosphere. In seminary I couldn’t give a “practice sermon” without feeling REALLY awkward. I literally had to bend it to the people sitting in front of me. I couldn’t act like it was a different crowd…just couldn’t do it.

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